Great expectations as social commentary essay

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Great expectations as social commentary essay

Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. At heart, Pip is an idealist; whenever he can conceive of something that is better than what he already has, he immediately desires to obtain the improvement. When he sees Satis House, he longs to be a wealthy gentleman; when he thinks of his moral shortcomings, he longs to be good; when he realizes that he cannot read, he longs to learn how.

First, Pip desires moral self-improvement.

Chapters 1–3

He is extremely hard on himself when he acts immorally and feels powerful guilt that spurs him to act better in the future.

When he leaves for London, for instance, he torments himself about having behaved so wretchedly toward Joe and Biddy. Second, Pip desires social self-improvement. In love with Estella, he longs to become a member of her social class, and, encouraged by Mrs.

Joe and Pumblechook, he entertains fantasies of becoming a gentleman. The working out of this fantasy forms the basic plot of the novel; it provides Dickens the opportunity to gently satirize the class system of his era and to make a point about its capricious nature.

Third, Pip desires educational improvement. This desire is deeply connected to his social ambition and longing to marry Estella: As long as he is an ignorant country boy, he has no hope of social advancement.

Great expectations as social commentary essay

Pip understands this fact as a child, when he learns to read at Mr. Social Class Throughout Great Expectations, Dickens explores the class system of Victorian England, ranging from the most wretched criminals Magwitch to the poor peasants of the marsh country Joe and Biddy to the middle class Pumblechook to the very rich Miss Havisham.

Drummle, for instance, is an upper-class lout, while Magwitch, a persecuted convict, has a deep inner worth. Dickens generally ignores the nobility and the hereditary aristocracy in favor of characters whose fortunes have been earned through commerce.

Crime, Guilt, and Innocence The theme of crime, guilt, and innocence is explored throughout the novel largely through the characters of the convicts and the criminal lawyer Jaggers.

In general, just as social class becomes a superficial standard of value that Pip must learn to look beyond in finding a better way to live his life, the external trappings of the criminal justice system police, courts, jails, etc. Magwitch, for instance, frightens Pip at first simply because he is a convict, and Pip feels guilty for helping him because he is afraid of the police.

Prompted by his conscience, he helps Magwitch to evade the law and the police.Do You Really Need to Write Word Blog Posts to Rank on Page 1? | Ep. # I have long called myself a social conservative. I think it is very important to have standards for behaviour (etiquette) and defined roles.

Great expectations as social commentary essay

The problems with this system is not that it exists, but the lack of flexibility and the value placed on them. Essay on Dickens' Social Commentary in Great Expectations Words | 8 Pages Dickens' Social Commentary in Great Expectations Charles Dickens' Great Expectations stands as one of the most highly revered works in all of English literature.

Europe. Dutch Protesters Planning Demos For and Against Black Pete. As Dutch children eagerly anticipate the arrival of their country's version of Santa Claus this weekend, opponents and. Pip’s desire for self-improvement is the main source of the novel’s title: because he believes in the possibility of advancement in life, he has “great expectations” about his future.

Ambition and self-improvement take three forms in Great Expectations —moral, social, and educational; these motivate Pip’s best and his worst behavior throughout the novel.

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